Government Funded Vaccinations

Vaccination is vital for a long and healthy life. Our guide provides details on free vaccinations in Australia across the lifespan.

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  • Birth
  • Hepatitis B
    2 Months (from 6 weeks)
  • Diphtheria - Tetanus - Whooping Cough
  • Polio
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hib
  • Pneumococcal
  • Rotavirus
  • Meningococcal B[note]
  • Meningococcal B & A,C,W,Y[note]
    4 Months
  • Diphtheria - Tetanus - Whooping Cough
  • Polio
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hib
  • Pneumococcal
  • Rotavirus
  • Meningococcal B[note]
    6 Months
  • Diphtheria
  • Tetanus
  • Whooping Cough
  • Polio
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hib[note]
  • Pneumococcal[note]
  • Influenza vaccination is funded under the NIP for children aged between 6 months and 5 years, and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged older than 6 months
    12 Months
  • Measles
  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Pneumococcal
  • Meningococcal B[note]
  • Meningococcal A,C,W,Y
    18 Months
  • Measles
  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Chicken Pox
  • Diphtheria - Tetanus - Whooping Cough
  • Hib[note]
  • Hepatitis A[note]
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  • Parents: Your child’s immunisation is required to be up to date before they begin child care, kindergarten or primary school.
  • 4 Years
  • Diphtheria - Tetanus - Whooping Cough
  • Polio
  • Pneumococcal[note]
  • Hepatitis A[note]
  • 5 Years
  • COVID-19
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  • Parents: Immunisation consent booklets will begin to be sent home for secondary school students.
  • 12-13 Schools Program
  • Diphtheria - Tetanus - Whooping Cough
  • Polio
  • Pneumococcal[note]
  • Hepatitis A[note]
  • 14-16 Schools Program
  • Meningococcal A,C,W,Y
  • 15 Years
  • Pneumococcal[note]
  • All people aged less than 20 years are eligible for free catch-up vaccines. The number and range of vaccines and doses that are eligible for NIP funded catch-up is different for people aged less than 10 years and those aged 10–19 years
  • Older Adolescents
  • Meningococcal A,C,W,Y[note]
  • Meningococcal b[note]
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  • During Pregnancy
  • Influenza[note]
  • Diphtheria - Tetanus - Whooping Cough[note]
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  • 20 Years and Over
  • Check with Immunisation Provider
  • Catch up vaccines for refugees and humanitarian entrants
  • 50 Years
  • Pneumococcal[note]
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  • 65 Years
  • Influenza
  • 70 Years
  • Pneumococcal
  • Shingles
  • 71 and Over
  • Shingles[note]
  • About Immunisation

    Immunisation is a safe and proven way to be protected against diseases that cause serious illness and sometimes death.

    Every day immunisations save lives and make it possible for Australians to live free from the illness and disability caused by many vaccine preventable diseases.

    By reducing the spread of disease, immunisation not only protects people who have been immunised, but also those in the community who are unable to receive vaccines or are unable to respond to the vaccines themselves.

    The immunisations listed in this guide are government funded and correct as at the date of publishing.

  • National Immunisation Program

    The vaccines listed in the National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule are provided free by the (federal) government.

    Immunisation schedules may differ in each State/Territory with some jurisdictions offering additional state funded vaccines. Please consult your relevant State or Territory Immunisation Schedule for current programs.

  • Which Vaccines

    Age, health, lifestyle and occupation (HALO) will determine which vaccines are recommended for you or your child.

    At different stages in your life you need different vaccines to protect you from certain infectious diseases.

    Health issues such as premature birth, asthma, diabetes, heart, lung, spleen or kidney conditions, will mean you can benefit from immunisation.

    Lifestyle choices such as overseas travel, sexual activity or smoking increase your need for immunisations.

    Some jobs expose you to a greater risk of contact with diseases, for example working in a hospital or daycare centre. These occupations increase your need for certain immunisations.

    For recommended vaccines that are not government funded, see your GP.

  • Missed your Scheduled Vaccinations?

    If some vaccinations have been missed, there may still be an opportunity to receive catch-up vaccinations covered by the NIP. These may include school vaccinations and immunisations for refugees.

    See your GP as soon as possible to ensure that you do not miss out.

  • Medically at Risk People

    People with medical conditions placing them at risk of serious complications from these infectious diseases.

    For information regarding medically at-risk adults, contact your GP.

  • Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples

    Vaccinations will vary, especially if you are living in high risk areas. Check with your GP or contact your State or Territory Department for details.

  • Vaccine Side Effects

    Side effects are typically mild, occurring soon after vaccination and usually lasting no more than a day or two. Generally no treatment is required.

    See your GP if you are concerned about a reaction to the vaccine.

  • Download the Guide

    Download the guide by clicking the link below Download Here

Page Published: 30 March 2022 | Page Updated: 13 April 2022